Easy Way to Obtain Veterinary Technician Certification

To obtain a vet tech certification is as easy as ABC. Is it true? What is the secret?

Before sitting for Veterinary Technician National Examination (VTNE), it is compulsory for the candidates to submit the proof of graduation from their veterinary schools to American Association of Veterinary State Boards (AAVSB) for approval. They will then be allowed to sit for the exam.

Here are some useful approaches to gain the certification in an easier manner:

o Always look for opportunities to enhance your clinical skills

You are advised to look for opportunities to expose yourself more to the real world. Grab the opportunities as many as possible through the lab practice and on the job training to learn the clinical skills such as first aid, emergency care, anatomy, routine care, surgical preparation, etc.

o Always look for ways to increase your knowledge in animal health care

You should always explore new knowledge in the related areas such as animal health and welfare, reproduction, veterinary technology, veterinary facility management, animal parasitological, animal anatomy and physiology, pharmaceutical, etc.

o Keep yourself updated with the latest technology and innovation

It is important for you to spend your time in reading different types of materials related to animals’ health issues and the researches done. It is also useful if you are able to keep yourself updated with the latest innovation such as newly invented equipments and instruments for surgical procedures

The candidates need to pass through the examination with the score of at least 70%. After getting the result, they must contact the licensing authority where they plan to work with to find out the requirements and procedures set by the state regulatory in order to obtain the license or certification.

After getting the certification, it is time for the newly graduated vet techs to start practicing the skills they have learnt under the close supervision of a licensed veterinarian. The journey as a vet tech begins here. The working life will be filled with challenges and fun.

Veterinary Technician Certification in Clinical Medicine Areas

As a veterinary technician, you have the responsibility of working with animals and providing the necessary care required in order to maintain the animal’s good health. Technicians will administer first aid, take x-rays, take samples for testing, and prep animals and instruments for surgery, among many other tasks. These individuals also have the option of earning more specialized certification, if they so wish. Especially for those who work in clinical medicine, the National Association of Veterinary Technicians in America (NAVTA) is a great resource. NAVTA has created a standard list of criteria for individuals interested in earning academy or society status through the Committee on Veterinary Technician Specialties (CVTS).

Societies are available to individuals who have an existing veterinary specialty and are interested in a focused discipline of veterinary medicine. In order to attain academy status, students must have already completed formal education and training at an accredited institution. Students MUST be a credentialed veterinary tech to register for further certification or specialization in an academy program.

The societies and academies listed below have been approved by NAVTA. However, this is not a complete list of all the academies available. After successfully completing an academy program, individuals will earn the Veterinary Technician Specialist (VTS) title in their chosen discipline.

• The Academy of Internal Medicine for Veterinary Technicians – those who work specifically with large animal medicine, small animal medicine, neurology, and oncology may be interested in this academy.

• The Academy of Veterinary Technician Anesthetics – designed for techs who wish to learn more about what is involved in anesthesia care. Students will learn about how to deal with an animal before, during, and after a surgery or procedure.

• The Academy of Veterinary Behavior Technicians – these individuals involve themselves with behavior health, problem prevention, behavior modification, management, and training. Often, behavior technicians work with animals and their owners on improving the bond between the two groups.

• The Academy of Veterinary Surgical Technicians – those who already have experience as surgical technicians should explore this academy in order to qualify for a national examination to become a VTS (Surgery).

• The Academy of Veterinary Technicians in Clinical Practice – for veterinary techs who are interested in this academy, a series of three subject areas will be studied: avian/exotic, canine/feline, and production animal.

Here is the list of the five societies:

• Society of Veterinary Behavior Technicians – students in this society will learn about behavioral subjects such as management, modification, and training.

• The American Association of Equine Veterinary Technicians – geared towards equine vet technicians and other related fields, this society will discuss aspects regarding horses.

• Association of Zoo Veterinary Technicians – focused on zoo animal medicine

• Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society – vet techs who work with veterinary emergency and crucial care medicine and surgery may be interested in this society. Those in this society will be educated on the proper practice involved in critical patient care and other animal-related emergency situations.

Veterinary Technicians and Dental Cleaning

A veterinary technician dental cleaning is great for companion animals. Don’t you just love the feeling of your teeth after a dental cleaning? Those nice and smooth pearly whites to show off to everyone? Well why shouldn’t companion animals have the same opportunity? Guess what, they do! Dental cleanings are a common procedure in most veterinary hospitals and rely heavily on the veterinary technician. There are even some veterinary hospitals that exclusively work in the dentistry aspect of veterinary medicine. Routine dental cleanings are important for companion animals to maintain healthy teeth and gums. Dental disease can lead to a variety of problems from facial abcesses to heart conditions. Veterinary technicians have the very rewarding duty of cleaning the teeth. Think of it as being a dental hygienist that cleans your teeth before the dentist examines your mouth.

The vet tech provides a central roll in the dental cleaning. It all starts with the preoperative exam where the veterinarian checks over the patient to make sure that the patient can handle the anesthetic. The vet tech helps to place an IV catheter as well as incubate the patient. Once the patient has been induced with anesthetic drugs, the veterinary technician is responsible for hooking the patient up to the anesthetic machine as well as monitoring equipment. During the procedure the vet tech is responsible for monitoring the anesthesia as well as the patients vitals (the veterinarian will often help to monitor as well). Most hospitals require that a patients vitals be taken at certain intervals and charted on a graph that will be kept with the patients dental records in the chart. The monitoring time can very, but usually the patients vitals should be taken at least every 5 minutes. The vitals include heart rate, breathing rate, oxygen level, blood pressure, temperature, capillary response time, and mucous membrane color. That is a lot of vitals! But it is important for the vet tech to monitor the patient for any abnormalities. It may also be the veterinary technicians duty to monitor the anesthetic level as well as IV fluid rate based on the patients vitals.

Now to the fun part! There is nothing more rewarding than removing the first big chunk of dental calculus (hardened plaque). Companion animals tend to build a large amount of calculus if the owner does not regularly clean the patients teeth or use dental treats. The veterinary technician will use a ultrasonic scaler to remove tarter from the teeth. After removing the tarter with the ultrasonic scaler the vet tech may need to also perform hand scaling with a dental instrument to be sure that all tarter is removed. The veterinary technician or veterinarian may also do subgingival scaling or root planing. Once all of the tartar is removed, the vet technician will check all teeth for any root pockets, furcation exposure, enamel defects, and any other abnormalities in the mouth. It is up to the vet tech to chart all teeth and any abnormalities for reference in future dental procedures. If the veterinary technician notices any abnormalities in a tooth, the veterinarian may decide that the tooth should be extracted. While the veterinarian is prepping for the extraction, the vet tech may be required to call the owner and discuss the potential extraction and the costs associated with it.

So for a veterinary technician, that is the basic dental procedure. There may be additional more advanced steps taken by the veterinarian depending on the severity of dental disease. I for one find a dental cleaning to be one of the most fun aspects of being a veterinary technician. Keep in mind that it is also the veterinary technicians duty to educate the client about dental products that can help to prevent the advancement of dental disease, for example using pet safe toothpaste and brushing daily. Also the client needs to know that there are dental treats available that help to keep the teeth clean and tartar free. By educating the client on the importance of oral health in pets, you are really helping to keep the pet as healthy as possible. And that is the overall goal of a vet tech!